In The Making – The Ivan Reyes Story

Every once in a while we are fortunate enough to see an extraordinary talent unfold before our eyes. Well, fortunately for some of us in the Bay Area we have been able to witness the commitment, drive and passion of Ivan Reyes transform into the evolution of a true musician, an inspirational role model, a talented music producer and a visionary entrepreneur. Throughout his journey, Ivan has been committed to helping under-served youth through his work at places like the Boys and Girls Club and the Movimiento De Arte y Cultura Latino Americana MACLA.

Ivan is an accomplished musician and a truly talented music engineer and producer.  In addition, he possesses both solid non-profit experience and that of the commercial recording industry. Through his leadership and passion, many creative arts organization and entertainment companies/artists have benefited.

Ivan’s latest designs are two unique companies known as TempLo and Escena. TempLo is a team composed of talented music producers out of the San Francisco Bay Area innovating music production with their versatile skill sets. Beyond the music, TempLo helps musicians establish a brand within the music industry. Escena encompasses the multi-media and visual arts to deliver premier photography products and video services in the Bay Area.

His latest project, Untamed,  is co-produced with The BeatPushers. The album consists of 8 songs featuring different singers from around the states and sounds like a party!

We invite you to enjoy this short video featuring “In the making – Ivan Reyes”

 

 

 

7th Annual Sabor del Valle FUNdraiser!

12821403_980994905314516_3197591635032258134_nJoin us at this years 7th Annual Sabor del Valle FUNdraiser at the Mexican Heritage Plaza.

Purhcase your ticket via link

==>  SVL2016

Jose Armando Perez Vega – SVL Collegiate Cultura Ambassador

 

Jose grew up in Northern California in a small town called Windsor where he along with his parents and two older brothers emigrated from Mexico in 1994. He is a first generation college student and thanks his parents and both brothers for his success; if it weren’t for them he wouldn’t be where he is today. He strives to one day repay them for all of the sacrifice they have done for him.

Jose Armando Perez Vega - SVL Cultura AmbassadorHe enjoys playing soccer on his down time, as he used to play competitively before college, also a four-year varsity soccer player in high school. He enjoys running and staying in shape and enjoys spending time with his family, watching sports like soccer and basketball, and exploring San Francisco and the cities surrounding it.

He is an active member of two organizations Hermanos Unidos de SFSU and ALPFA at SF State. However, he is currently studying abroad in Madrid, Spain taking Business Administration classes.

Hermanos Unidos – a non-profit organization that engages in events like community service, academic, and social networking with the intention to break social Latino stereotypes. He took the leadership role of Community Service Chair during the academic year 2014-2015 where he planned community service events benefitting the Latino community in San Francisco.

ALPFA – a non-profit organization where he participates in workshops that improve skills in public speaking, networking, resume building and professionalism. He has taken various leadership roles, Director of Social Affairs Fall 2015, and currently the Director of Corporate Partnership.

action 1With the help of ALPFA he interviewed and was offered an internship with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) for summer 2015 to join their Start Internship program. After completion he was offered and accepted an extension for this upcoming summer of 2016 where he will join the Start Master Internship. He also served as an informal liaison to PwC in bringing new talent from San Francisco State to join the firm. Two of his ALPFA referrals who are now members will be joining him at PwC in the summer.

He aspires to become a CPA (Certified Public Accounting) after graduation and towards the end of his career payback by first obtaining a master or PhD in education and teach High Schools students in his hometown of Windsor, CA.

 

Do you know how to Rock Your LinkedIn Profile?

 

IMG_2803

With over 400 million members and 2 new members joining every second, LinkedIn is the largest professional network and has become one of the top recruiting sources for employers. At the recent sold out San Jose State University Latino Alumni Network (SJSU LAN) LinkedIn Networking Event – “Rock Your Profile” attendees were able to learn how to make their profile stand out from other candidates straight from the source.

Teresa Leija, Associate Program Manager, presented a step-by-step approach to build and expand your networks with your LinkedIn profile. During the presentation, she stressed the importance of how using every feature will increase the views to your profile.

  • Adding a professional photo increases profile views by 14x
  • Including a summary increases profile views by 10x
  • Including work experience increases profile views by 12x
  • Adding volunteer experience and causes increases profile views by 6x

IMG_2804

You get the picture- the more you use LinkedIn’s profile features the more views to your profile. It is so important that you don’t leave anything blank or empty.

Here are a few more ways to really ROCK your profile:

  • Spend some time really crafting your headline. It should explain what you do, show your passion and value. Spend just as much time, if not more, creating a compelling summary that focuses on your career accomplishments and aspirations. The summary should be less than 740 words and include keywords not buzzwords!
  • Make your profile dynamic and visually appealing with presentations, photos and videos that tell your professional story. If you don’t have any media to share, Teresa suggested adding a general presentation about your company and utilizing SlideShare to get ideas for presentation decks and infographics.
  • Add skills that are a mix of high-level and niche skills and try obtaining endorsements for those skills.
  • Complete the volunteer experience section of your profile. Teresa stated that 41% of hiring managers see volunteer work just as valuable as professional experience.
  • Be active and engaged on LinkedIn
    • Join at least 5 groups in your industry
    • Read Pulse to build your knowledge
    • Follow LinkedIn influencers that resonate with you such as Arianna Huffington, Richard Branson, and Gwen Stefani to name a few
    • Share links, articles and quotes at least twice a week. Try adding a question in your comment to spark conversation and reaction.
  • Take advantage of the LinkedIn publishing tool to post your own articles. Kathy Goss, Diversity Recruiting Lead, noted that your posts are a way to deeply explore topics that matter to you and an opportunity for potential employers and recruiters to know more about you.
  • Increase your skillset with Lynda.com an invaluable online learning platform to learn business, technology, software, and creative skills through videos.

IMG_0720

On top of the networking and profile tips, another great part of this event was that the attendees had a glimpse of the LinkedIn company culture by being onsite and listening to the panelists from the internal employee resource group HOLA (Hispanics of LinkedIn Alliance) moderated by Sean Cevera, Diversity & Recruiting Champion. The panelists included Matthew Mendiola, Talent Solutions Support Specialist, Nicole Prairie, Customer Success Manager, and Andrew Trevino, Recruiter. They shared their unique experiences which in turn led to their current positions at LinkedIn. For example, Nicole discussed leveraging her Portuguese language skills as she navigated her career path including working abroad in Germany. Andrew talked about how he transferred his recruiting efforts at the UC Berkeley campus for a recruiter position at LinkedIn. Matthew shared the importance of being a part of the conversations about corporate culture and making connections in your career.

Your LinkedIn profile is not only a way for potential employers and recruiters to find you but also a great way to be known for what you do and strengthen your reputation. Be sure to take advantage of all the LinkedIn tools and tips in this article to ROCK your profile!

If you are interested in learning more about upcoming SJSU Latino Alumni Network’s events be sure to follow SJSU LAN on Facebook, sign up for their eNewsletter or become a member.

Carlos Barraza – SVL Cultura Ambassador

 

Silicon Valley Latino is delighted to present our latest Collegiate Cultura Ambassador, Carlos Barraza. Carlos is a dynamic, vibrant and focused young man who is currently a third-year student at San Jose State University. He is pursuing his Bachelors Degree in Business Management. He lived in El Salvador for seven years where he was immersed in the Latino culture and learned to perfect his Spanish.

Carlos Barraza - SVL Cultura Ambassador

Residing in a different country inspired his travels to various countries and to study the intersection of business and culture, specifically to investigate how culture impacts business practices, strategies and approaches. Carlos has been able to apply these unique insights in his classes on business and human behavior. Throughout the past couple of years he has also held various jobs that have allowed him to experiment and apply different project management skills in roles such as a high school substitute teacher, marketing intern (at a startup) and a street team member for a Major League Soccer (MLS) team.

 

These experiences coupled with his initiative and drive to be an effective contributor, have allowed him to be a productive and valuable team member. He has certainly been team oriented in his approach both in school and at work, which has helped him work well with others in projects and allowed him to adapt quickly to shifting situations. In one of his classes, he was on a team that was assigned a project on how to solve for,  “How can companies better attract and retain millennial talent?”  Carlos was able to inspire his team to work collaboratively and develop an effective presentation for Google employees that received very positive feedback. His positive attitude allows him to work well with others and even inspire others to elevate their game. His focus and perseverance are other very valuable traits that others around him appreciate and have come to count on.

Carlos Barraza - SVL Cultura Ambassador

Carlos is also an active member of the San Jose State University Latino Student Business Association where he participates in engaging discussion on how to enhance offerings as well as in their corporate tours where they visit various Silicon Valley companies. Additionally, Carlos is also an active member of Delta Upsilon Fraternity at San Jose State University. There he is also an active member of the Judicial Committee where he helps oversee the administrative justice of other fraternity members who have not up-held appropriate behavior according to the Delta Upsilon bylaws.

 

When Carlos isn’t studying he enjoys living in Downtown San Jose and also loves heading up to San Francisco and experiencing the many dining options the city has to offer. He also enjoys playing basketball and challenging himself in the gym as well as salsa dancing. Currently Carlos is looking for exciting internship opportunities so if your company is looking for a great intern, Carlos is your man!

 

We look forward to following Carlos’s collegiate endeavors and introducing him to the rest of the Silicon Valley Latino familia!

 

Cisco’s “Conexion” – High Impact, Inclusion & Collaboration!

 

Silicon Valley Latino was a media partner to Cisco’s Hispanic Heritage Month event a few months ago. While there, we had the opportunity to interview several Conexion (Cisco’s Latino Employee Resource Organization) Board Members about the group’s purpose, strategies and impact.

 

We are proud to have many of our Cultura Ambassadors lead Conexion’s efforts and impact in the community through many programs such as “Escuela” and “High School Career Fairs”.  Additionally, this featured video showcases Conexion’s multiple values, from an innovative relationships, products, and culture perspective, as well as through talent pipeline and strategic community outreach.

 

“Conexion plays an integral part in Cisco’s Inclusion and Collaboration strategy. It’s about creating an incubator for innovation, best practices, and collaboration across the globe” says Maria Medrano, Inclusion and Collaboration Strategist, Cisco.

 

We would also like to thank Anne-Marie Azzi and Beatriz Medina Pratt for their exemplary leadership to Conexion for the past two and a half years.  During their tenure, Conexion received numerous awards and recognition, such as Silicon Valley Latino ERG of the Year 2014, Top ERG Award by Latina Style and HITEC, the Hispanic IT Executive Council in 2014. Would also like to give a special thanks to Conexion Executive Sponsors, Guillermo Diaz Jr, Senior Vice President and CIO and Yvette Kanouff, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Cloud Solutions. Silicon Valley Latino would also like to give a warm welcome to the new Conexion co-presidents, Juan Del Villar and Oscar Gomez, we look forward to collaborating with them as they step into their new roles.

 

From a personal perspective it’s been a true pleasure to see so many of our Cultura Ambassadors grow professionally and climb the corporate ladder.  A few we would like to recognize today are Guillermo Diaz Jr., Ileana Rivera, Anne-Marie Azzi, Beatriz Medina Pratt, Katty Coulson, Esmeralda Barriga, and Francisco Espana.

 

We look forward to following Conexion and featuring more of their work in 2016!

 

 

Mexican Consulate presents Cross – Border Art & Tech Talk

 

Silicon Valley Latino was delighted to be a media partner as The Consulate General of Mexico in San Jose presented a lunch discussion panel on immigration, the arts and the tech sector on April 1st at the San Jose Museum of Art with guest speakers: Katie Aragon from FWD.US, Professor Matt Spangler from San Jose State University and Curator Emmanuel Audelo from the Mexican organization Habitajes. The panel was moderated by the Consul of Media Relations and Cultural Affairs, Loren Cruz, who remarked about the interest of the Consulate in promoting a positive image of Mexico and the Latino community in the area.

 Cross - Border Art & Tech Talk Lunch

The discussion panel featured the contributions of the Latino community in the US and Silicon Valley, while drawing strategies in order to promote the participation of the Mexican community and for them to take a greater advantage of the programs that could enhance the exercise of their rights in this country, and the wellbeing of their families.

 

This panel highlighted the strength of the Latino community. Economically the Latino community has a purchasing power of more than $1.3 billion USD which represents the 10% of the country. Since 2008, the purchasing power of the Hispanic community has increased by 45% and it is expected to reach $1.7 billion USD by 2017. Mexican immigrants are also business owners that create numerous jobs. In fact, the Latino community has more than 2.3 million businesses, which accounts for more than 8% of the firms in the US. These businesses create more than 2 million jobs. Mexican immigrants, including second and third generations, account for 8% of the GDP of the US, and the Latino community’s influence in the economy is actually growing. Currently one sixth of the US population is Latino, and two thirds of them are of Mexican origin. In fact, more than 20 million people of Mexican origin reside in Texas and California, and these are the two of the principal state economies of the US!

 Cross - Border Art & Tech Talk Lunch

All of the speakers brought very interesting insights to the discussion. Professor Spangler, for instance talked about the different kinds of immigrants that come to this country in order to be able to understand the myths behind immigration currently in the US in this political period. The San Jose State Professor’s research also shows that immigrants are not taking jobs from US citizens. On the other hand, Katie Aragon from FWD.US highlighted the numerous contributions that immigrants have made in the tech sector as well as industries and how immigration reform could help to regularize and match the needs of the industry in Silicon Valley and further create wealth in the US. Emmanuel Audelo, talked about how the arts are the right vehicle to join communities, eradicate myths behind immigration and work together towards a future with less social violence.

 

The Consulate General of Mexico in San Jose would like to give special thanks to the San Jose Museum of Art and Silicon Valley Latino for making this event possible as well as to those who joined this special discussion panel.

 

Latina Coalition Silicon Valley Toastmasters Open House

We welcome additional members of the Latina Coalition to participate in this ongoing professional development. Our Open House will serve as a mock meeting where current Latina CoalitionToastmasters members will showcase their improvements thus far. 

Please join us for this exciting opportunity to learn more about the Latina Coalition Toastmasters Club. 

Note: Meeting will take place at the Sobrato Center for Nonprofits in Conference room Cupertino A. Light snacks and refreshments will be provided. 

http://latinacoalition.org/

Cisco’s 2015 Hispanic Heritage Month

 

Silicon Valley Latino had the pleasure of covering Cisco’s 2015 Hispanic Heritage Month .

Impacto Latino! That was the theme of Cisco’s first annual Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration  held on October 21, 2015 at its San Jose campus. Hosted by Conexión, Cisco’s Latino ERO, the event showcased the contributions made by Latinos, both at Cisco and across the globe, and also celebrated the unique Latino culture with food, music, art and dancing. The event coincides with the U.S. observation of HHM which is recognized from September 15 – October 15, the anniversary of independence for several Latin American countries.

Cisco Hispanic Heritage Month 2015Over 200 attendees joined locally and from remotes sites in Mexico City, Brussels, Raleigh, NC, Austin, TX, and Boxborough, MA to hear from the great line up of speakers, network with their peers and celebrate. The agenda featured several Cisco leaders including Guillermo Diaz, Jr., SVP & CIO and Executive Sponsor of Conexion, Shari Slate, VP, Chief Inclusion & Collaboration, and Maria Dincel, Director, Sponsor Marketing and Head of Olympic Games.  In addition, a professional development component was offered and Gina Rudan, leadership coach and author of Practical Genius, delivered a keynote.

Event speakers:

Guillermo shared the impact Conexión has made over the past 17 years and highlighted the continued efforts to develop the next generation of Latino leaders at Cisco. He also shared the impact that Conexion had on his career and encouraged the audience to disrupt themselves and inspire exponentially.

Maria shared Cisco’s sponsorship plans for the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics and the efforts Cisco is making in Brazil around country transformation.

Gina Rudan shared her 5 steps to leveraging your practical geniusand the importance of marrying the heart and the mind to create your genius.

Shari highlighted the power of partnerships to help unleash the power of our talent. She also shared the progress made by the Office of Inclusion and Collaboration to transform the company.

Following the main event, attendees in San Jose had the opportunity to network with their peers, learn Zumba, and connect with local Latino owned businesses – PONDL Winery, Vino Latino, Voces Wine, Tico Coffee Roasters, Teatro Vision, Ventana de Flores and Latino Art Expressions.  Conexión

Silicon Valley Latino looks forward to covering Cisco’s 2016 Hispanic Heritage Month event.

If you were a part of this event share your experience with the Silicon Valley Latino community.

Don’t just look for a Mentor: Develop your Personal Board of Advisors!

Article originally posted on LinkedIn by Cultura Ambassador Leandro Margulis

In this series, professionals thank those who helped them reach where they are today. Read the posts here, then write your own. Use #ThankYourMentor and @mention your mentor when sharing.

“You need a mentor.”

 

If you’re like most working professionals, this is one of the first pieces of advice you heard around college graduation or upon landing your first job.  (Stressed out at work? Get a mentor. Not sure how to navigate office politics? Get a mentor. Want to know whether going to grad school or switching careers is the right option for you? Get a mentor. Ad nauseum.)

But whether you received this advice from one of your professors, your mom, your neighbor, or a co-worker, finding a mentor is a lot easier said than done. (It’s not only hard to locate someone with the professional chops and time to help you out, it can be even harder for some people to ask for help in the first place.) And how do you know whether the mentor you do eventually hook up with is the right person to help you with your current challenges, let alone professional issues you encounter five or ten years from now?

Here’s the thing—you don’t.

The reality is that we need more than one mentor throughout our careers. We need many different mentors for many different things. We not only need different mentors over time as our careers grow and change, we also need different mentors at the same time.

Again, easier said than done, right? Well, not if you play your cards right.

You probably aren’t close friends with the all the people you spent every weekend with in high school anymore. Why not? Because you’ve changed a lot since high school, that’s why—you have an adult life with adult responsibilities. And just like you’ve moved on from several of your old high school friends, the close confidants you have at your current job or career stage may not be able to relate to you a decade down the road when you’re navigating the complex issues a top manager or executive faces, either.

Mentors are human—they have their own strengths and weaknesses, just like you do. They grow and change, just like you do. And the people you look up to as role models now might not be the role model you want a decade or even a year from now. Or you may find yourself needing help in a pinch for a unique business or personal situation that your current mentor has no concept of.

You Need a Team

This is where having a team of mentors, rather than just one, can come in handy. Take it from me—I once relied on only one professional mentor. But I soon found I needed more than that. So I eventually evolved past having just one mentor to having what I like to call a Personal Board of Advisors.

My advisors come from many different walks of life. Some are young—even students—while some are my age or older. Some work in my field, and some come from other fields. Some are still working, and some are retired. In all cases, though, they have a certain type of expertise or experience that I’m lacking—whether it’s a deep trove of professional contacts, financial acumen, the ability to speak frankly about difficult topics, or wisdom gained from many years of experience. (Or in the cases of my young/student advisors, it’s often youthful energy and a better understanding of new technologies like Snapchat, Periscope, or other emerging social-media platforms.) This allows me to have a variety of people I can choose from when I need specific advice about different topics at different times.

In this way, my personal board of advisors is similar to the boards of directors that advise CEOs at major corporations. Corporations make a point to build advisory boards where each member contributes according to a different specialty or strength. Why not have the same kind of board for your professional and personal development?

As my own personal board of advisors illustrates, not all mentors are gray-haired businessmen in drab suits. They are young and old, male and female, working and retired, in your industry and outside it.

Your own Personal Board of Advisors is out there, waiting to help you. You just need to go out and find them, and build those relationships. (Be prepared to mentor them in return, too—a big part of relationship-building is reciprocity.)